Capitalism2.0

Hub category

A Rethink for Corporate Sustainability: A Sustainability Ombudsperson?

Business is not doing enough to address environmental problems. It’s time to rethink how we can be most effective – perhaps we need a strategy that enables our CSR leaders to act as direct conduits between the firm and external interests.

SwimAgainstTheCurrent

My first big CSR/sustainability event was the 2010 Net Impact Conference held at the University of Michigan’s Ross Business School. I had been invited there to speak on a panel on the topic of intrapreneurship, which gave me the opportunity to sit in on a number inspiring and insightful talks. One of the sessions I attended was an interview with Aron Cramer, the CEO of BSR. As I recall, much of that hopeful, engaging discussion centered on transparency – a topic that’s close to my heart.

Read More »

Also posted in Capitalism 2.0, Innovation, The Hub | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Another Radical Sustainability Idea: Pay Employees at Least a Fair Living Wage

fair wageHere is another breakthrough corporate CSR idea; How about paying employees at least a fair living wage? My last blog suggested A Wild and Crazy Corporate CSR Idea: Pay Your Taxes.

At the risk of being overly innovative by simply stating the obvious, I humbly suggest a second breakthrough corporate social responsibility (CSR) program: pay all employees at least a Living Wage. Otherwise, corporations may be setting themselves up for public embarrassment, like the report that went viral last October about how McDonald’s US pays its workers below-poverty-line wages while its “McResource” employee help line encourages them to use food stamps and government assistance to make ends meet. That is, McDonald’s wants the government (a.k.a. tax-paying citizens) to top up their paltry workers’ wages. Awkward. McDonald’s has since discontinued its McResource.

Read More »

Also posted in Business and Sustainability, Ethics, The Hub, Thought Leader | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Pay your damn taxes! Are Sustainability Rankings Missing Something?

Bob WillardNo one enjoys paying taxes. You don’t. I don’t. Companies don’t either. But it’s our civic duty. Without tax revenues, governments cannot provide us with the health, education, safety, security, and infrastructure services that are vital to our well-being in a flourishing society. Taxes are a necessary and a good thing. Corporate taxes are vital. However, over the past 50 years, the share of tax revenue coming to the federal government from business has collapsed. According to the U.S. Tax Policy Center, corporate taxes represented 32% of U.S. federal government revenues in 1953; 23% in 1966; 12% in 1998; and 9% in 2010. There seems to be trend.

Read More »

Also posted in Business and Sustainability, Capitalism 2.0, Ethics, Sustainability Reporting, The Hub, Thought Leader | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

It’s time for a unifying metric that measures well-being and inclusive prosperity

Why does sustainability reporting have to be so complicated? It often feels like we’re striving for half measures or incremental improvements.  Surely we can do better.

Upward spiral

What if there was a unifying metric that allowed companies to measure their influence on well-being throughout their value chain? And only if and when companies performed to a high well-being standard would the rewards, financial and otherwise, follow.

[Join TSSS and CSRwire on March 20th 1:00 - 2:00 pm EST for a new WEBINAR SERIES, Capitalism 2.0: A Deeper Dive.  We will be joined by the author of “The Economics of Happiness”, Mark Anielsk, who will share his views on the Future of Capitalism and how well-being is emerging as the new bottom line for business.  Listen to a recording of the webinar by Clicking Here]

Read More »

Also posted in Business and Sustainability, Capitalism 2.0, Leadership, new economy, Social and Environmental Impacts, Sustainability Reporting, The Hub | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

When did citizens/taxpayers become a top-up mechanism to subsidize low wage workers’ pay?

[Editor's note: Thankfully here in Canada we don't have many of these issues but for low wage employees...it's no paradise here either.  The social component of corporate sustainability clearly has a role to play BUT will the system allow for the necessary change?]

Unionize

Fast food giant MacDonald sparked widespread scorn recently when it was found to have provided its low wage workers with tips about saving money, like “Breaking food into pieces often results in eating less and still feeling full” and advice on applying for food stamps.

Read More »

Also posted in Business and Sustainability, Capitalism 2.0, Ethics, Social Impact, systemic change, The Hub | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed
  • THEHUB_button
  • Upcoming Events

  • Strategic Partners